Flights to Tokyo

Compare Cheap Flights to Tokyo, Japan

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What's on in Tokyo?

Shogatsu

Shogatsu is the Japanese New Year Celebration. Much like the rest of the world, it takes place on 1 January, but you’ll want to fly into Narita International Airport (NRT) on 30 December and stay until 3 January to take part in all the festivities. As one of the biggest festivals in the country, it's an incredible event to attend if you’re interested in using return flights to Tokyo to learn about Japanese culture. Vendors sell traditional food, the Emperor of Japan prays for the nation, and the public is allowed to enter the palace grounds on 2 January. If you want to get a good deal on cheap flights to Tokyo over this period, book your trip at least three months in advance.

Kanda Matsuri

Kanda Matsuri is a massive celebration held in May. Each year, more than 100 shrines are carried through Tokyo's streets. If you have tickets to Tokyo over the festival’s dates, you'll see large processions of priests, dancers and musicians in the streets, all dressed in traditional costumes.

Yasukuni Shrine Mitama Matsuri

In July, more than 30,000 lanterns light up the road to the Yasukuni Shrine. It's a tradition which honours the dead soldiers who defended Japan in past battles. The event is held over four days, and there are food stalls, games and a haunted house to visit. Plan your flights to Tokyo around the festivities and join the large crowds of spectators watching the lively parades and musical events.

What are the best things to do in Tokyo?

Senso-Ji

Senso-Ji is a beautiful Buddhist temple in the Asakusa district. It's the oldest temple in Tokyo and one of the most visited religious sites in the country. Book your return flights to Tokyo to join the group of more than 30 million people who visit the temple every year. For the best chance to taking photos without the crowds, time your visit for early in the morning.

Harajuku

Harajuku is one of the most famous neighbourhoods in Tokyo, and visiting the area often ranks high on the to-do list of visitors travelling to Japan with flights to Tokyo. In fact, devotees of the Harajuku sub-pop culture may buy tickets to Tokyo just to visit and take in the area’s iconic street fashion. Other things to do in Harajuku include stopping at the kawaii cafes, restaurants, and quirky shops. Bring your appetite on a trip to Takeshita Street as this strip is known for its photogenic fare. Plus, don’t forget to charge your camera the night before your visit as the streets of wider Harajuku are brimming with colourful artworks - making for plenty of striking photo opportunities!

Imperial Palace

The Imperial Palace was built in 1888 and is the official residence of Japan's Imperial Family. If you can, plan to buy your return flights to Tokyo in the spring. The Imperial Palace East Gardens are in full bloom, and don't leave without visiting the Nijubashi Bridge. The bridge’s double reflection has made it one of the most photographed sites at the royal complex.

Hamarikyu Gardens

The gorgeous Hamarikyu Gardens are spread across 25 hectares. The gardens date back to the Edo period and visitors can explore a traditional Japanese teahouse, seawater ponds, plantings of colza flowers, and 300-year-old pine trees. If your flights to Tokyo fall over autumn, the foliage in the gardens is an especially photogenic sight.

What are the best restaurants and cafes in Tokyo?

Robot Restaurant

Arguably one of the most popular restaurants in Tokyo, Robot Restaurant is a unique dining experience. Diners are entertained by performing robots, dragons, ninjas, and clowns, all set to a background of electronic music and neon lights. If it sounds like something you'd love to experience, book a table as soon as you've confirmed your flights to Tokyo or once you’ve landed at Narita International Airport (NRT).

Katsuzen

On the hunt for some authentic Japanese cuisine? Roll up to Katsizen in the Ginza neighbourhood. On the menu, you'll find deep-fried pork cutlets (known as tonkatsu), one of Japan's favourite comfort foods. Katsuzen is one of Tokyo’s Michelin-starred eateries, so rest assured that their tonkatsu is among the best in the city. Given its profile, it’s best to make a booking well ahead of time. Ask your hotel to help you once you’ve arrived from your flights to Tokyo.

Sato Yosuke

Craving a bowl of delicious udon noodles? There's no better place than Sato Yosuke. This diner is known for its traditional Inaniwa udon, and these amazing thick wheat-flour noodles are all homemade. The noodles are available in dishes served in a hot or cold broth, and the latter is often accompanied with soy or sesame miso dipping sauces. There are four Sato Yosuke outposts around Tokyo, so check to see which is closest to your accommodation before taking off on your flights to Tokyo.

Sushi Dai

What's a trip to Tokyo without some sushi? Sushi Dai will not disappoint hungry travellers looked to sate their appetite for Japanese cuisine thanks to their airfare to Tokyo. Order picks from the a la carte menu, or splurge on omakase offering - the Japanese tradition of letting the chef choose your order. Another reason to visit Sushi Dai is the dining experience itself. It can only seat 10 diners at a time, and it is common for people to wait up to two hours to get in. Add a trip to Sushi Dai to your Tokyo to-do list if you’re not in a rush.

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